Dealing With Dry Mouth

Dealing With Dry Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA

A healthy adult produces about three pints of saliva each day. It’s not the kind of thing you would give thought to very often, but that saliva plays a very important role in maintaining your health.

Saliva serves many purposes. It contains enzymes that aid in digestion. Saliva makes it easier to talk, a fact recognized by those who experience stage fright and the associated dry mouth while giving a presentation. 

Saliva also helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and debris from the teeth and gums. It neutralizes damaging acids, enhances the ability to taste food and makes it easier to swallow. Minerals found in saliva also help repair microscopic tooth decay. 

Everyone, at some time or another, experiences dry mouth, also called “xerostomia.” It can happen when you are nervous, upset or under stress or as a result of medication you take or other medical therapies. If dry mouth happens all or most of the time, however, it can be uncomfortable – and it can have serious consequences for your oral health.

Drying irritates the soft tissues in the mouth, which can make them inflamed and more susceptible to infection. Without the cleansing effects of saliva, tooth decay and other oral health problems become much more common. 

Regular dental checkups are important. At each appointment, report any medications you are taking and other information about your health. An updated health history can help identify a cause for mouth dryness. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

What is Dry Mouth?

What is Dry Mouth?
Dry mouth means you don’t have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you’re nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to more serious health problems or indicate that a more serious medical condition may exist. That’s because saliva does more than just keep the mouth wet -it helps digest food, protects teeth from decay, prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth, and makes it possible for you to chew and swallow.

There are several reasons that the glands that produce saliva, called the salivary glands, might not function properly. These include:

  • Side effects of some medications – over 400 medicines can cause dry mouth, including antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers, diuretics and medicines for high blood pressure and depression.
  • Disease – diseases that affect the salivary glands, such as diabetes, Hodgkin’s, Parkinson’s disease, HIV/AIDS and Sjogren’s syndrome, may lead to dry mouth.
  • Radiation therapy – the salivary glands can be damaged if your head or neck are exposed to radiation during cancer treatment. The loss of saliva can be total or partial, permanent or temporary.
  • Chemotherapy – drugs used to treat cancer can make saliva thicker, or “ropey,” causing your mouth to feel dry.
  • Menopause – changing hormone levels affect the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and post-menopausal women with a persistent feeling of dry mouth.
  • Smoking – many pipe, cigar and heavy cigarette smokers experience dry mouth. 

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Dry Mouth (xerostomin)

Dry mouth, or xerostomin is the result of decreased saliva production, which affects up to 60% of older adults. Saliva lubricates the mouth helping to prevent decay and protect tooth enamel. But don’t worry; there are plenty of ways to manage this condition.

Dry mouth can be caused by a variety of reasons, including medications you may be taking, radiation or cancer treatments, smoking, immune deficiency, systemic diseases (such as Diabetes, Parkinsonís, Sjogren syndrome) or salivary gland aplasia.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Diabetes and Your Mouth # 2: Control Diabetes to Keep Your Smile

Well-controlled diabetes contributes to a healthy mouth. If you have poorly controlled or high blood sugar, your risk increases for dry mouth, gum disease, tooth loss, and fungal infections like thrush. Since infections can also make blood sugar rise, your diabetes may become even harder to control. Keeping your mouth healthy can help you manage your blood sugar.

The above article is from: WebMD.com


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Dry mouth

A dry mouth isn’t just unpleasant, it’s bad for your teeth. Saliva washes away cavity-causing bacteria and neutralizes harmful acids.
“Without saliva, you would lose your teeth much faster—it helps prevent tooth decay and other oral health problems,” says Meinecke.
Drink lots of water, chew sugarless gum, use a fluoride toothpaste or rinse, and consider over-the-counter artificial saliva substitutes. See your doctor if it’s a frequent problem.
Above article from:  Health.com

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048