6 Habits That Harm Your Teeth (And How to Break Them): Using Your Teeth As Tools

Using Your Teeth As ToolsThe habit: Your teeth were made for eating, not to stand in as a pair of scissors or hold things when your hands are full. When you do this, you put yourself at a higher risk of cracking your teeth, injuring your jaw or accidentally swallowing something you shouldn’t.

The solution: Stop and find something or someone to give you a hand. Your mouth will thank you.

To read the entire article please visit MouthHealthy.org

 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Habits That Wreck Your Teeth: Bedtime Bottles

Bedtime BottlesIt’s never too early to protect teeth. Giving a baby a bedtime bottle of juice, milk, or formula, can put new teeth on a path to decay. The baby may become used to falling asleep with the bottle in his or her mouth, bathing the teeth in sugars overnight. It’s best to keep bottles out of the crib.

Above article from: webmd.com/oral-health
 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Habits That Wreck Your Teeth – Chewing on Ice

 

Chewing on Ice
It’s natural and sugar free, so you might think ice is harmless. But munching on hard, frozen cubes can chip or even crack your teeth. And if your mindless chomping irritates the soft tissue inside a tooth, regular toothaches may follow. Hot foods and cold foods may trigger quick, sharp jabs of pain or a lingering toothache. Next time you get the urge for ice, chew some sugarless gum instead.

Above article from: webmd.com/oral-health

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

 

12 foods that naturally whiten your teeth

whiten your teeth

We’ve all been told to avoid red wine, dark berries, and black coffee in our quests for pearly whites, but what about foods that actually brighten your smile? Try these natural solutions for a brilliant beam.  By Julia Marino

Strawberries
They may be bright red, but malic acid, a chief component of this summery fruit, acts as a natural astringent to remove surface tooth discoloration, says Dr. Irwin Smigel, president of the American Society for Dental Aesthetics. Fresh, juicy strawberries taste great in any meal—salads, desserts, cereal—and are widely available at farmers markets this time of year, so getting your daily dose is both simple and delicious.

Apples
The loud crunch you hear when you bite into this hard fruit may be annoying, but it’s also good for your choppers. Apples’ crispiness strengthens gums, and their high water content increases saliva production, dispersing and neutralizing colonies of bacteria that lead to bad breath and plaque, says Smigel.

Water
Drink lots of water to keep your mouth hydrated and your smile bright, advises Smigel, who recommends sipping and swishing between glasses of wine and when eating dark, pigmented foods to prevent staining. However, while water reduces the acidity in your mouth and the resulting damage to your enamel, Dr. Smigel warns against imbibing too much sparkling water, which has greater potential to erode enamel and harm teeth.

To view all 12 foods go to: Yahoo – http://tinyurl.com/p6mru46

 

Above article by: Julia Marino
 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Why Are Minerals and Nutrients Important for Oral Health?

You must include minerals and nutrients in your diet in order for the body’s tissues to resist infection. The presence of too much or too little of any nutrient can have harmful effects, particularly on the mouth and teeth, and may contribute to oral diseases and infection.

Which vitamins and minerals are good for me?

There are many minerals and nutrients that are good for the entire body. Here are just some of the minerals and nutrients your body needs to stay healthy:

Calcium. Your teeth and jaws are made mostly of calcium. Without enough calcium in your diet, you risk

developing gum disease and tooth decay. Calcium is found in many foods and liquids, such as milk,

yogurt, cheese, beans, and oysters.

Iron. Iron deficiency can cause your tongue to become inflamed, and sores can form inside your mouth.

Iron is found in many foods, including liver and red meat. Other iron-rich foods include bran cereals,

some nuts, and spices.

Vitamin B3 (niacin). A lack of vitamin B3 can cause bad breath and canker sores in the mouth. To boost your B3 levels, eat chicken and fish.

Vitamins B12 and B2 (riboflavin). You also can develop mouth sores when you do not consume enough of the vitamins B12 and B2. Red meat, chicken, liver, pork, fish, as well as dairy products like milk, yogurt, and cheese, are good sources of vitamin B12. Vitamin B2 is found in foods like pasta, bagels, spinach, and almonds.

           

Vitamin C. Too little vitamin C will lead to bleeding gums and loose teeth. Sweet potatoes, raw red peppers, and oranges are great sources of vitamin C.

             

Vitamin D. It is very important to consume enough vitamin D because it helps your body  absorb calcium. A diet lacking or low in vitamin D will cause burning mouth syndrome. Symptoms of this condition include a burning mouth sensation, a metallic or bitter taste in the mouth, and dry mouth. Drink milk, and eat egg yolks and fish to increase your vitamin D intake.

Which foods may be bad for my mouth and why?

Not all foods are good for your teeth. If you consume these foods, do so in moderation, and be sure to practice good oral health care.

           

Carbohydrates. Bacteria feed on leftover foods in the mouth and produce acid, which causes decay. Carbohydrate-laden foods, such as chips, bread, pasta, or crackers, can be as harmful to the teeth as candy.

           

Sticky, chewy foods. Raisins, granola bars, jelly beans, caramel, honey, and syrup stick to teeth and make it difficult for saliva to wash the sugar away.

           

Sugary snacks. Snacks like cookies, cakes, or other desserts contain a high amount of sugar, which can cause tooth decay.

           

Gum and candy. Chewing gum and eating candy is very harmful to your teeth. As you eat, sugar coats your teeth, which can lead to cavities.

           

Carbonated soft drinks. Regular soda (or pop) contains an extremely high amount of sugar. Both regular and diet sodas also contain phosphorous and carbonation, which wears away the enamel on your teeth (causing them to become stained and brown).

           

Fruit or vegetable juices. Fruit and vegetable juices tend to be high in sugar, which can damage tooth enamel and lead to decay.

  

To ensure that you’re getting the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals your body needs, check out the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Web site at www.mypyramid.gov.

Above article from: KnowYourTeeth.com


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Soda or Pop? It’s Teeth Trouble by Any Name

Soda or Pop? It’s Teeth Trouble by Any Name

It’s called “pop” in the Midwest and most of Canada. It’s “soda” in the Northeast. And it goes by a well-known brand name in much of the South.

People across North America use different words to identify a sugary, carbonated soft drink. But however they say it, they’re talking about something that can cause serious oral health problems.

Soft drinks have emerged as one of the most significant dietary sources of tooth decay, affecting people of all ages. Acids and acidic sugar byproducts in soft drinks soften tooth enamel, contributing to the formation of cavities.

In extreme cases, softer enamel combined with improper brushing, grinding of the teeth or other conditions can lead to tooth loss.

Sugar-free drinks, which account for only 14 percent of all soft drink consumption, are less harmful1. However, they are acidic and potentially can still cause problems.

Read the entire article at: www.colgate.com

Above article written by: www.colgate.com


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

What causes a cavity?

CavityYour mouth is a busy place. Bacteria – tiny colonies of living organisms are constantly on the move on your teeth, gums, lips and tongue.
 
Having bacteria in your mouth is a normal thing. While some of the bacteria can be harmful, most are not and some are even helpful.
 
Certain types of bacteria, however, can attach themselves to hard surfaces like the enamel that covers your teeth. If they’re not removed, they multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. More bacteria of different types attach to the colony already growing on the tooth enamel. Proteins that are present in your saliva (spit) also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film on the tooth. This film is called plaque, and it’s what causes cavities.
 
Above article written by: HealthyTeeth.org
 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Learn about dental sealants

What Sealants Do for You
A sealant is a clear shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars 
and molars), where decay occurs most often. This sealant acts as a barrier, protecting the decay prone areas of the tooth from plaque and acid.
How Sealants are Applied
Each tooth only takes a few minutes to seal. First, the teeth that will be sealed will be cleaned. The chewing surfaces are then etched (roughened) with a weak acidic solution to help the sealant adhere to the teeth. Finally, the sealant is placed onto the tooth enamel and hardened. Some sealants need a special curing light to help them harden, while others do not.
dental sealants
Who Should Have Sealants
Although children receive significant benefits from sealants, adults can also be at risk for pit and fissure decay and thus be candidates for sealants. Your dentist can advise you about the need for sealants. Sealants are also recommended even for those who receive topical applications of fluoride and who live in communities with 
fluoridated water. Fluoride helps fight decay on the smooth surfaces of the teeth but is least effective in pits and fissures.
How Long Do Sealants Last
When the sealant is applied, finger-like strands penetrate the pits and fissures of the tooth enamel. Although the sealant cannot be seen with the naked eye, the protective effect of these strands continues. As a result, it may be several years before another application of sealant is needed. Reapplication of the sealants will continue the protection against decay and may save the time and expense of having a tooth restored. Sealants will be checked during regular dental visits to determine if reapplication is necessary.

Above article written by: DentalHealthOnline.net

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048