Dental Caries: How They Are Formed and What You Can Do to Prevent Them

Dental CariesDental caries (cavities) are the most common form of oral disease known to man, and the process of getting caries is called tooth decay.
Tooth decay is the destruction of your tooth enamel — the hard, outer layer of your teeth. This issue can affect children, teens and adults. Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, is constantly forming on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods or beverages containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth, and over time the enamel can break down, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

The types of caries formed can be broken down into two major groups:

Pit and fissure caries. These are found most often on the chewing surfaces of the back (molar and premolar) teeth, and the back of the front (anterior) teeth. Your teeth are composed of several sections of enamel, and where these sections meet, pits and grooves can trap plaque, causing decay. The proper application of pit and fissure sealants, a hard plastic material applied to seal the grooves and pits when the teeth have erupted, can prevent this type of dental caries. The sealants also make it less likely that you will need restorations (fillings) on those surfaces of the teeth.

Smooth surface caries. These are found most often along the gumline or where two teeth touch (interproximal or the space between teeth), if plaque forms in those areas. With the proper use of dental floss, you can prevent most smooth surface caries in the interproximal area, and using a manual or power toothbrush along the gumline can prevent caries in that area as well.

To read the entire article written by Richard A Huot, DDS, please visit Colgate.com

 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Bioactive Glass Leads to Longer-Lasting Fillings

Longer-Lasting FillingsDentists complete 122 million composite tooth restorations in the United States each year, according to Oregon State University (OSU). But the average lifetime of posterior dental composites is only 6 years. Bioactive glass may improve their durability and provide some of the minerals that have been lost to tooth decay.

“Bioactive glass, which is a type of crushed glass that is able to interact with the body, has been used in some types of bone healing for decades,” said Jamie Kruzic, a professor at the OSU college of engineering. The hard and stiff material can replace the inert glass fillers now mixed with polymers to make modern composite tooth fillings.

“This type of glass is only beginning to see use in dentistry, and our research shows it may be very promising for tooth fillings,” he said. “The bacteria in the mouth that help cause cavities don’t seem to like this type of glass and are less likely to colonize on fillings that incorporate it. This could have a significant impact on the future of dentistry.”

Bioactive glass is made with compounds such as silicon oxide, calcium oxide, and phosphorous oxide, and it looks like powdered glass. Its antimicrobial effect is attributed, in part, to the release of ions such as those from calcium and phosphate that have a toxic effect on oral bacteria and tend to neutralize the local acidic environment.

“Almost all fillings will eventually fail,” Kruzic said. “New tooth decay often begins at the interface of a filling and the tooth and is called secondary tooth decay. The tooth is literally being eroded and demineralized at that surface.” 

To read the entire article, please visit DentistryToday.com

 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Tooth Cavities

Tooth CavitiesTooth cavities aren’t uncommon — but with the right dental health know-how, you can help prevent them. It all starts with proper brushing, daily flossing, and fluoride. Get the details right here.

What Causes Tooth Cavities?
Cavities are holes in the teeth resulting from acid attack. They generally start in the enamel, but can spread to the softer inner layer of the tooth. Tooth cavities are caused by decay that can occur when foods containing carbohydrates become trapped between teeth, and are not completely removed with brushing and flossing. Bacteria living in the mouth digest these foods, generating acidic byproducts that can eat away at tooth enamel.

Help Prevent Tooth Cavities

Fluoride, which is found in most public drinking supplies, some mouth rinses, and Crest toothpastes, helps prevent tooth cavities by slowing the breakdown of enamel and speeding up the remineralization process. Check with your dental professional to see if your drinking water is fluoridated. If it isn’t, he or she may recommend that you use high concentration fluoride treatments.

To help strengthen weak spots in tooth enamel, and help prevent the early stages of tooth decay, brush regularly with a fluoridated toothpaste, floss daily, and visit your dental office regularly for professional cleanings.

Above article from: Crest.com

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry

7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

How does plaque cause a cavity?

plaque cause a cavity
The hard, outside covering of your teeth is called enamel. Enamel is very hard, mainly because it contains durable mineral salts, like calcium. Mineral salts in your saliva help add to the hardness of your teeth. Mineral salts, however, are prone to attack by acids. Acid causes them to break down.
For an experiment about the power of acid, check out the Healthy Teeth Dental Experiments page!
The plaque that forms on your teeth and doesn’t get washed away by saliva or brushed away by your toothbrush produces acid as it eats up sugar. This acid is produced inside the plaque and can’t be easily washed away by your saliva. The acid dissolves the minerals that make your tooth enamel hard. The surface of the enamel becomes porous – tiny holes appear. After a while, the acid causes the tiny holes in the enamel to get bigger until one large hole appears. This is a cavity.
It’s important to see your dentist before a cavity forms so that the plaque you can’t reach with your toothbrush or floss can be removed.
Above article written by: HealthyTeeth.org
 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

What causes a cavity?

CavityYour mouth is a busy place. Bacteria – tiny colonies of living organisms are constantly on the move on your teeth, gums, lips and tongue.
 
Having bacteria in your mouth is a normal thing. While some of the bacteria can be harmful, most are not and some are even helpful.
 
Certain types of bacteria, however, can attach themselves to hard surfaces like the enamel that covers your teeth. If they’re not removed, they multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. More bacteria of different types attach to the colony already growing on the tooth enamel. Proteins that are present in your saliva (spit) also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film on the tooth. This film is called plaque, and it’s what causes cavities.
 
Above article written by: HealthyTeeth.org
 
JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048