Diet, Food Choices and Healthy Gums

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA 

Can food or drink choices help a person have healthier gums?

Japanese researchers studied a group of nearly 950 adults to determine whether consuming dairy products with lactic acid like milk, yogurt and cheese, had a lower risk for gum disease.

Participants’ periodontal health was evaluated through two measurements – periodontal pocket depth and clinical attachment loss of gum tissue. Researchers found that participants who consumed 55 grams or more each day of yogurt or lactic acid drinks had significantly lower instance of periodontal disease. They found that consuming milk or cheese was not as beneficial to periodontal health.

Researchers theorize that the probiotic effect of Lactobacillus bacteria could be related to healthier gums. Another Japanese study showed that adults who drank green tea might also lead to healthier gums, because its antioxidants have anti – inflammatory properties.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

The Difference Between Plaque and Tartar

Lots of people ask their dental professional if there’s a difference between plaque and tartar-and it’s a great question. Both plaque and tartar buildup are common dental problems. Significant plaque buildup can result in tooth decay and gum disease. Tartar is calcified plaque. Arming yourself with the facts can help you be smarter about how you care for your teeth. 

The Facts About Plaque
Plaque is sticky, colorless film containing bacteria that builds up naturally on tooth surfaces and especially along the gum line within four to 12 hours after brushing. Sugars in food and drinks can combine with plaque bacteria to release acids. These acids attack tooth enamel and break it down, which can then create cavities. Plaque bacteria can also contribute to gum disease, like gingivitis. Regular brushing and flossing are your most effective tools in the fight against plaque. If it’s not removed daily, plaque eventually accumulates and hardens into tartar.  

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays – continued

#5: Watch out for starchy foods 
These are sneaky because they often get trapped in your teeth. If you choose to indulge in chips and cakes, take extra care when you floss that day to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque build-up. 

#6: You can still have fun 
So, what can you eat? Lots of stuff! Make lean protein choices, such as lean beef, skinless poultry and fish and vary your diet. Eat whole grains and choose low-fat or fat-free dairy foods. The holidays are a great time of year to start thinking about healthier habits. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, and vegetables-for your overall health and the health of your teeth.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays – continued

#3: Limit your alcohol intake 
’Tis the season for egg nog, Brandy Alexanders and glog! If you choose to imbibe, try to drink water alongside your drinks. And remember: Too much alcohol can dry out your mouth. 

#4: Take it easy on the hard candies 
Some candies are more problematic than others. Hard candies can put your teeth at risk because in addition to being full of sugar, they’ve also been known to cause broken or chipped teeth. (Be careful not to break or chip your teeth when eating nuts as well!) 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Dry Mouth (xerostomin)

Dry mouth, or xerostomin is the result of decreased saliva production, which affects up to 60% of older adults. Saliva lubricates the mouth helping to prevent decay and protect tooth enamel. But don’t worry; there are plenty of ways to manage this condition.

Dry mouth can be caused by a variety of reasons, including medications you may be taking, radiation or cancer treatments, smoking, immune deficiency, systemic diseases (such as Diabetes, Parkinsonís, Sjogren syndrome) or salivary gland aplasia.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

The Importance of a Good Diet

In a perfect world, there would be no cavities – but unfortunately that would mean there would have to be no sugar, and let’s be honest, that’s never going to happen.

Maintaining a healthy and balanced diet isn’t just important to your overall health, its important to your oral health as well. Frequent or prolonged intake of sugary foods enables bacteria to maintain an acidic environment on the surface of your teeth. Soft and sticky foods cling to the biting surfaces of the teeth and stay there until itís brushed off. Saliva will spread the sugar between the teeth, and to the front and back.

So how do cavities occur and that ugly dental decay?
Every time you eat, plaque and bacteria in your mouth mix with the sugar and starch from the food you ingest, creating an acidic environment in your mouth. This acid softens the enamel of your teeth, and without proper oral hygiene, can expose your teeth to troublesome cavities.

How to reduce the risk of decay:

  • Brush daily with fluoridated toothpaste.
  • Follow your country’s food guide necessary for a healthy diet.
  • When eating starchy foods such as bread, cereal and pasta, minimize the time teeth are exposed by eating them with meals rather than snacking on them throughout the day.
  • Substitute sugary snacks with sugar-free gum and mints. Xylitol found in some chewing gums has been found to reduce risk of cavities. This can help reduce cavities and increase saliva flow.
  • Drink high-sugar beverages through a straw, then rinse mouth with water and brush within 30 minutes. But be careful, brushing to quickly following a meal can damage your teeth’s enamel.
  • Rinsing with water after eating can help cleanse the teeth before brushing.

To read the entire article please visit Plus.HealthyTeeth.org


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048

Oral Health & Other Medications

Knowledge is power. Your dentist will tell you, the more information they know about your overall health and current medications as possible, the easier to better understand your oral health needs. Because we know good overall health requires great oral health, and the mouth is the gateway to the rest of the body, it should come as little surprise that many serious health issues are linked to problems that first started in the mouth. And the same goes with any medications you may be taking.

Before your dentists starts their examination or any other procedure, make sure to disclose any and all mediations you may currently be taking. Some procedures or prescribed medications can have adverse effects when taken in combination. In addition, alert your dentist to any allergies, so prescribed medication can be as effective as possible. The same goes for pregnancy, or other health care treatments you may currently be experiencing, which may cause changes to your body. This can help avoid tooth loss, gum disease or other oral health issues as side effects of treatment you may currently be experiencing.

It’s always a good idea not only discuss these things with a physician, but also a dentist as well to ensure your oral health is monitored as well.

To read the entire article please visit Plus.HealthyTeeth.org


JONES SMILES
Sedation ~ Cosmetic ~ Family Dentistry
7330 Spout Springs Road, Suite C15
Flowery Branch, GA 30542
(770) 965-3048